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Thread: Steyr LP50 multishot pistol with Side wheel scope - .a first!

  1. #1
    Marksman
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    Default Steyr LP50 multishot pistol with Side wheel scope - .a first!

    Just put this package together...I can't put this pistol down...
    It is so much fun to shoot!!
    Shoots 5 shots as fast as u can squeeze that trigger and it does it consistently since the pistol is regulated.
    That is a 10 shot target shot at 20M with JSBs at around 480fps...
    The Leapers 3-12X44 super compact side wheel scope with 80mm side wheel is the perfect companion for it...now we need a pistol FT class in the competitions.

    I am going to experiment further and try to get the velocity up to the late 580s...
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  2. #2
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    very nice.. if steyr makes a semi-auto lg110 with 12+shots mag ... i will take 2... 1 for watch.. 1 for play....

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  3. #3
    Protea FT Team '08

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    Guido , is there enough eye refief to shoot the pistol in the usual manner ?
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  4. #4
    Marksman
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    no since it is a rifle scope...shoots very well off the bench and off the knee in an FT position.

    true long eye relief pistol scopes with side wheel focusing do not exist...
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  5. #5
    Protea FT Team '08

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    Nice to have nice toys .Enjoy it!
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  6. #6
    Inactive Member

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    I'd love one of those LP 50 s . One of these days ! !
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  7. #7
    Inactive Member

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    Drool!
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  8. #8
    Marksman
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    so anyone for pistol FT?

    read this

    IPFTA
    A New Air Pistol Game
    By David Day
    Having a good spotter helps with hitting distant air pistol field targets About two years ago, several avid New England airgunners were debating the possibility of air pistol competitions generating any local interest among airgun shooters. Given the overwhelming acceptance of rifle competitions in the region, few felt that there would be a desire for shooters to branch out into non-rifle airgun activities. On a trial basis, one of the local clubs in Connecticut initiated an experimental program of air pistol metallic silhouettes to gauge acceptance of formalized air pistol shooting. file:///C|/Documents%20and%20Settings/Wayne%20Trapp/My%20Documents/April/IPFTA_Article.htm (1 of 12)3/23/2004 1:51:05 PM IPFTA In retrospect, it would probably have been a good idea to stockpile IZH 46M’s prior to starting metallic silhouette competition as the program resulted in at least a dozen sales of this pistol during the first year of the experiment. Also, by the end of the experimental air pistol shooting season it was noted that match registrations for air pistol competition were significantly surpassing registrations for rifle matches. At one of the last silhouette matches of that first season, someone set up a few field targets for general plinking, and before long the air pistol silhouette shooters were trying out all sorts of contorted shooting positions in an attempt to knock down field targets at 20-30 yards. Those of us who were shooting that day realized that knocking down a field target with an air pistol was both enjoyable and EXTREMELY difficult with targets beyond 20 yards. This experience caused much debate by shooters that day for the possibility of running pistolonly field target competitions. Out of this debate, it was concluded that AAFTA did an excellent job of issuing rules and guidelines for field target competitions. However, when it came to adopting the AAFTA rules and guidelines to pistol shooting, a number of changes needed to be made as the AAFTA processes were primarily intended to govern rifle field target competitions. Consequently, the idea of IPFTA (International air Pistol Field Target Association) was born. The objectives of IPFTA are as follows: a. To promote air pistol field target competition. b. To establish a standardized, yet flexible set of rules for air pistol field target competition. c. To serve as a sanctioning body for championship matches at the state, regional, national, and international levels of air pistol field target competition. d. To merge the disciplines air pistol metallic silhouette and field target into a new sport that would have wide attraction to airgun shooters. Of the main objectives, establishing standardized, yet flexible rules and generating a formal organization to sanction championship matches were the two areas of main importance. Because air pistols, in general, produce much lower energy and velocity levels than air rifles, the IPFTA founders realized that shooting distances would need to be shorter and kill zone sizes would need to be larger than those commonly found in air rifle field target events. Additionally, based on trial and error as well as experiences of others who had dabbled in air pistol field target, everyone recognized that traditional field targets suited for rifle competition were responsible for a significant amount of frustration when air pistols were used in field target shooting activities. Very often, if a field target mechanism intended for rifle use was not appropriately tuned and exactly level on it’s base, hits to the kill zone would result in inconsistent knockdowns. If the file:///C|/Documents%20and%20Settings/Wayne%20Trapp/My%20Documents/April/IPFTA_Article.htm (2 of 12)3/23/2004 1:51:05 PM IPFTA targets were set with too little standing tension, repeated hits outside of the kill zone could cause such targets to topple. Eventually, this problem resulted in an entirely new field target design. But more on that later. IPFTA Rules A complete copy of the IPFTA rules and other important IPFTA information can be found at www.ipfta.net The IPFTA rules are fairly similar to AAFTA for Air Rifle matches with several notable
    exceptions:
    1. The distances for the targets range from 10 yards to 25 yards. 2. The kill zones range in size from ¾” to 2” with a contrasting circle approx ½” in diameter surrounding the outer edge of the kill zone. 3. There are 4 classes of competition with no distinction between spring-powered, precharged pneumatic and CO2 pistols. These exceptions were based on fairly extensive testing of a number of pistols and field targets at various distances. With a properly adjusted and level field target, it was found that the sub-400 fps muzzle velocity pistols in .177 calibre would not consistently topple targets placed beyond 25 yards. Thus the maximum shooting distance was set at this range so that those shooting with lower-powered pistols would not be unduly disadvantaged. The kill zone maximum size was based upon tests with several air pistols. It was found that most pistols, shot from a Creedmore position could consistently put 10 shots into a 2” circle at 25 yards when the shooter did his part, so 2” was designated as the maximum kill zone size for IPFTA. file:///C|/Documents%20and%20Settings/Wayne%20Trapp/My%20Documents/April/IPFTA_Article.htm (3 of 12)3/23/2004 1:51:05 PM IPFTA The classes of competition for IPFTA are Open Sights – Standing, Open sights – Any position, Unlimited Sights – Standing and Unlimited Sights – Any Position. IPFTA rules allow unmagnified red-dot sights to be used in the Open Sights categories while laser sights are excluded from competition. In the Any Sights categories, telescopic sights up to 12X magnification can be used. Air pistols that are allowable in IPFTA competition includes pistols powered by pumping, CO2, Spring powered, and pre-charged pneumatic with barrels not to exceed 12 inches in length and a calibre exceeding .25”. The muzzle energy of the pistol may not exceed 20 ft. lbs. In order to qualify as an ‘air pistol’ the match director is allowed to make a determination of the weapon’s status as a ‘pistol’ based upon the ready ability of a typical shooter to hold and fire the weapon in a safe one-handed standing position. This rule allows use of pistols which are cut down from rifle actions and stocks while eliminating undue advantage of a configuration that would more approach a rifle than a pistol. In the standing position, the only contact that is allowed with the pistol is one or two hands. Any type of hold in the standing position that results in bracing of the pistol by supporting the arms against the torso, locking elbows into the hips, etc, is not allowed. In the any position classes, the only contact that is allowed with the pistol is two hands and any portion of the shooter’s clothed anatomy that is not aided by any device, attachment to the pistol, or attachment to the clothing. Because of the way the IPFTA rules are designed, shooters have an opportunity to compete with guns that are basically ‘stock’ up to guns which may be considered fairly experimental. If one is looking for difficulty in IPFTA competition, then the Standing open-sights classification may be the way to go. If one is looking to knocking down a maximum number of targets with consistency, then the Unlimited Sights-Any Position classification with a 12” barrel and 12X scope would be the logical choice. IPFTA Air Pistols file:///C|/Documents%20and%20Settings/Wayne%20Trapp/My%20Documents/April/IPFTA_Article.htm (4 of 12)3/23/2004 1:51:05 PM IPFTA The Aeron Chameleon – A CO2 powered .177 airgun with Burris 3-12 ‘Ballistic Plex’ scope parallax corrected for 10-25 yards and adapted Daystate muzzle flip compensator. This rig is perfect for IPFTA in warm weather months. Although almost any air pistol can be used in IPFTA competition, experience is showing that certain air pistol characteristics increase chances for success. Other than accuracy, the other major concern in pistol selection is muzzle velocity. Because trajectories in sub-400 fps guns rapidly decline after about 18 yards, airguns with muzzle velocities exceeding 500 fps have been found to be better suited to success at IPFTA competition. This would include a number of precharged pneumatic guns such as the Falcon FN8 series and CO2 guns such as the TAU 7 series. As far as sights are concerned, there are many available red-dot options in the Open Sights classifications. In the Unlimited Sights classifications, there are a number of good choices available for optics ranging from riflescopes to pistol scopes. One issue with most pistol scopes though is the lack of adjustable objectives that allow for parallax-free focusing at a variety of distances. One notable exception is the Burris 3-12X pistol scope that features an adjustable objective. An added benefit of this scope is that it comes in the Burris ‘Ballistic Plex’ reticle configuration which is a real plus when dealing with pronounced projectile drop over normal IPFTA ranges of fire. Unlike most pistol scopes, the Burris scope, with some factory modification can be adjusted to focus down to 10 yards. file:///C|/Documents%20and%20Settings/Wayne%20Trapp/My%20Documents/April/IPFTA_Article.htm (5 of 12)3/23/2004 1:51:05 PM IPFTA The Beeman P-3 with an Aimpoint red-dot file:///C|/Documents%20and%20Settings/Wayne%20Trapp/My%20Documents/April/IPFTA_Article.htm (6 of 12)3/23/2004 1:51:05 PM IPFTA IZH 46M with a Cabela’s Pine Ridge selective reticle Red Dot is a Good ‘open sight’ IPFTA competitor Target Considerations One of the most important considerations in conducting an enjoyable IPFTA event is having targets that will consistently fall down when hit by a pellet from a relatively low powered air pistol. Experience has shown that many field targets designed for air rifle use are very fussy in their adjustments when it comes to appropriate settings for air pistol. The mechanism must be adjusted to allow consistent falls from sub-400 fps guns at 25 yards while simultaneously avoiding falls from strikes outside the kill zone from the higher powered pistols that may be used in IPFTA events. file:///C|/Documents%20and%20Settings/Wayne%20Trapp/My%20Documents/April/IPFTA_Article.htm (7 of 12)3/23/2004 1:51:05 PM IPFTA A Bingham Brother’s IPFTA target. Readyto go! Two factors come into play when preparing field targets for an IPFTA match. First, it is recommended that the settings for each and every target be thoroughly tested prior to conducting an IPFTA match to assure consistent knockovers while avoiding ‘false’ knockovers from the higher powered guns. A second factor that is extremely important is that all targets be perfectly level at the place where they are to be positioned on the course of fire. Even a modest downhill slope of the target can result in failure of targets to fall because the mass of the target face is often great enough to overcome the toppling energy provided by lower-powered air pistols. Uphill slopes can cause just the opposite effect by allowing the target to fall with hits outside the kill zone. So, when setting targets out on an IPFTA course, a level is very much recommended to check for appropriate target placement. There are several target makers who produce field targets specifically for IPFTA use or that can be readily adapted to IPFTA use. The Bingham Brothers in New Hampshire(dlygrnd@aol.com) make an exceptional target that has a very stout spring-loaded mechanism. The Bingham targets are extremely responsive to the low energy of downrange pellets from low-powered air pistols while avoiding ‘false’ knockovers from hits to the target faceplates from higher-powered air file:///C|/Documents%20and%20Settings/Wayne%20Trapp/My%20Documents/April/IPFTA_Article.htm (8 of 12)3/23/2004 1:51:05 PM IPFTA pistols. Dick Otten of After Hours Target Company (http://fieldtargets.com) also makes a fine series of field targets that can be consistently adapted to IPFTA competition with a little bit of experimentation with the target mechanism settings. IPFTA Events, Sanctioning and Membership There are no dues for membership in IPFTA. Local events are typically not ‘sanctioned’ by IPFTA. Only events which are billed as ‘Championship’ events at the State, Regional, National, or International levels are sanctioned by IPFTA. The whole purpose behind the sanctioning process is to provide an organization which recognizes the particular club or individual who hosts a championship event at a State, Regional, or National level. The sanctioning process is not difficult and can be completed with one form submitted to IPFTA headquarters. With the exception of National and International championships, sanctioning requests are typically processed on a ‘first come – first serve’ basis as long as the hosting club meets minimum requirements for the requested ‘championship’ event. All sanctioned events appear on the Events calendar at www.ipfta.net. There are no fees associated with the sanctioning of events. Shooting an IPFTA Event file:///C|/Documents%20and%20Settings/Wayne%20Trapp/My%20Documents/April/IPFTA_Article.htm (9 of 12)3/23/2004 1:51:05 PM IPFTA To examples of acceptable shooting positions that are highly effective in the IPFTA Any Position – Unlimited Sights competition. The only ways to describe an IPFTA event is HUMBLING. Air pistol competition is usually associated with either a controlled indoor environment or outdoor metallic silhouette competitions where targets of a known size are shot under fairly constant lighting conditions at known distances. With IPFTA, one adds the elements of unknown target distances, variable kill file:///C|/Documents%20and%20Settings/Wayne%20Trapp/My%20Documents/April/IPFTA_Article.htm (10 of 12)3/23/2004 1:51:05 PM IPFTA zone sizes, and ranges of fire that are somewhat longer than other air pistol competitions. Add on top of that, variable lighting conditions, an uneven wooded terrain, the pronounced down-range trajectory of most air pistol projectiles, and IPFTA adds up to one bear of a challenge! About the only way to really understand IPFTA is to try a match. If your local shooting club already has a set of airgun field targets, a little experimentation with adjustments of the knockover mechanisms along with actual shooting of the targets with a variety of air pistols will allow you to identify those targets that can be relied upon to routinely fall when hit in the kill zone during a course of fire. Use these targets to lay out a course of fire, and invite your airgun shooting friends to try an IPFTA competition. If its challenge you are looking for in a shooting experience, you will certainly find it in IPFTA! The most challenging IPFTA class of all – Open Sights - Standing file:///C|/Documents%20and%20Settings/Wayne%20Trapp/My%20Documents/April/IPFTA_Article.htm (11 of 12)3/23/2004 1:51:05 PM IPFTA To learn more about becoming a member of IPFTA or conducting an IPFTA event, go to http:// www.ipfta.net on the internet.
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  9. #9
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    lol... there will be enough reading for my x-mas
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  10. #10
    Sharp Shooter
    Doctor BAM

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    Congratulations, Guido.......
    You have just posted the longest post in the history of this Forum......!!!!

    Malan :awais :awais :awais :awais
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