Page 76 of 76 FirstFirst ... 26667273747576
Results 1,126 to 1,138 of 1138

Thread: Road to knife making - The unfolding story of Merwe Knives

  1. #1126
    Sharp Shooter
    ARF Member Of The Year 2011

    User Info Menu

    Default

    The second Kukri is finished, only need to do the sheath still. The plan was to make it a rough and ready to go tool for chopping the reeds that invaded my backyard from the veld next door so I can rig my infra red alarm beams. So I started out with a chunk of 5160 spring steel in annealed form from the mill and as I worked it the distinctive bluish color of the 5160 got me carried away once more. I made the number hundred knife way back using this steel, that knife ended up with a serious collector and I have forgotten what a nice steel it was... It is very simple to heat treat, being an oil quench high carbon steel and it is as tough as it's name suggests once properly tempered; spring steel it is called. Soaked at non magnetic 830degC for 17mins (it is 6mm thick) and then oil quenched it sits at around 62-63hrc hardness. An hour temper at 195degC brings it down to around 56-57hrc and as tough as one needs a chopping tool to be. Excellent edge holding, (I've made razors from it). It needs to be cared for though, it's not stainless so will discolor if neglected so a slight oiling is needed and it must be dried after cleaning.
    So what was to be a rough and semi finished garden tool turned out to be one of the prettier knives I've made. The Kukri shape has grown on me I must admit and the mysterious ancient tales and customs surrounding it makes for a very nostalgic knife. It is said that one's Kukri had to sleep with you under your pillow. This one is pretty enough to sleep under my pillow for sure. I'll post detailed pics after the weekend once I've made the sheath.

    Then, I've discovered my half finished Ulu project that got misplaced during my house move. I've done the heat treat and it will shortly get a handle:
    Air Rifle SA Forums Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

  2. #1127
    Springer FT World Champion '09
    SAFTAA FT Colours '12
    Forum Sponsor

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Damn... I hate paying you compliments, but you force me to!!!!

    Awesome thread to follow Derrrrrrrrrik!
    Air Rifle SA Forums Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

  3. #1128
    Bex
    Bex is offline
    Sharp Shooter

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Derek
    Sterling work as usual.

    I have a tip for you for the carbon steel blades. I have a few carbon steel knives and I have found that instead of oil I rub the whole blade with a piece of candle to cover it completely with wax, you can then leave it as is for storage or run hot water over the blade to remove the excess wax leaving it shiny but with an invisible layer of wax protecting it.
    In the picture below the water on the blade just rolls off the wax layer leaving the blade completely dry.
    Air Rifle SA Forums Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

  4. #1129
    Springer FT World Champion '09
    SAFTAA FT Colours '12
    Forum Sponsor

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Nice idea!!!
    Air Rifle SA Forums Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

  5. #1130
    Sharp Shooter

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DvdM View Post
    The first Kukri, the collectors order is done. It was a slow grind, taking the hollow around that fat blade belly. I used the small 150mm wheel for a nice deep hollow sacrificing minimum blade weight. I've done some more research on the Kukri use, the guys speak of the 'sweet spot' on the blade, that is the bottom of that belly where most energy will be transferred during chopping action.
    Then there's the thing about the 'che', that funny little notch at the ricasso. As with most very old traditions the little 'che' has become a bit of a controversy as to it's actual purpose over the years. My first guess would have been blade catcher, but the kukri is not likely to be used as a fencing blade, it's a slasher/chopper. It is called a 'blood dripper' and a way of 'drawing first blood' by pricking your own finger tip with it, well, just some of the more rose-colored/gory explanations..
    My best guess after the most logical explanation of it being a religious symbol of sorts is that it might be a unique maker's mark. Having studied photos of quite a few original historic Kukri's I've noticed quite a variety of shapes and forms of the 'che'.
    So I never the less included a 'che' on request of the client. And before we shout 'weak spot on the blade', I would not have considered a 'che' on 4mm steel if it was not 14c28n surgical grade stainless where the blade is so narrow. I have full trust in this steel toughness-wise as to feel it can handle the little notch without ever risking a crack there. The Kukri is tempered down to 57/58hrc.
    As for blade finish:
    The client wanted a military look so I opted for a bead blast surface on the blade flats which I mottled down even more by running the 'scotchbrite' belt lightly over it creating an almost camo pattern. I don't like the idea of coating high grade stainless with anything softer than the steel itself so paint or polymer was out of the question. The final effect on the steel worked very nice, something I'll use again in future.
    The handle is mahogany with a giraffe bone insert:



    And the sheath, not pig skin Andir, would not know where to source that but good old veg tanned cowhide. (I have no qualms with consuming beef so cowhide will have to do) The blade slides out the sheath in a forward motion to accommodate the belly:


    I'm busy with the next Kukri, using 6mm 5160 high carbon spring steel. Plan is to make it look antique so I'm going with a rough forged look as finish. This one I'll take the grind up higher with 300mm wheel since the steel is thick and I need to lose some weight:


    Thanks for looking.
    Baie baie mooi mes daai Derek. Ek hou van die military design incorporation!!!

    Air Rifle SA Forums Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

  6. #1131
    Sharp Shooter
    ARF Member Of The Year 2011

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bludlust View Post
    Damn... I hate paying you compliments, but you force me to!!!!
    Awesome thread to follow Derrrrrrrrrik!
    Thanks Bludster, I just KNEW the tanto spin on the Kukri would get your attention

    Quote Originally Posted by Trompie View Post
    Baie baie mooi mes daai Derek. Ek hou van die military design incorporation!!!
    Dankie vir die kompliment Trompie, dit is 'n far cry van die oorspronklike maar die vorm leen homself vir 'n rowwe no-nonsense militere gevoel.

    Bex, thanks for that tip. I have taken it a step further and added some liquid paraffin to the candle wax to make it softer and easier to apply. Works like a charm!

    The second Kukri is done, sheath and all.
    Like I said, it started out as a knife meant to be added to the garden tools as a reed chopper. But then while finishing the 5160 spring steel after heat treat I got carried away by the beauty of the steel. (It has a blueish tinge to it, a subtle hint as to the toughness of the spring steel albeit not stainless) So I decided to do it justice and finish it into a fine knife.
    Here's my thinking behind the final product:
    I started out with 6mm steel stock, it is meant to chop wood too besides reeds so I wanted weight on the blade. Since carrying a very long knife on the side becomes a problem when sitting down in a camp chair or car seat I opted for a shortish Kukri as Kukris come. At 190mm blade length it is still not a small knife but can be carried on a belt.
    I put the air hammer to the steel to give it a rough forged look. I'm not worried about 'stress risers' that may cause cracks by hammering it since it is still in annealed state when hammering and it is not a water quenched steel so quenching in oil is less aggressive and I've never had a single problem with cracks on oil quenched steel be it 5160 spring steel, 1095 file steel or O1 tool steel. And I use oil formulated for quenching and not a mix of slave blood and pork fat or any of the mysterious concoctions smiths managed to come up with for non-stainless steel quenches through the ages. ( I also don't have to wait for full moon to heat treat ) Might also be because I don't judge hardening temperatures by 'red' or 'cherry red' in the kiln, I have the luxury of a digitally temperature controlled kiln. But me being me, I did do a magnetic test at heat treat temperature 'just in case' I could prove my kiln's calibration wrong The kiln was spot on.

    Playing with the steel blank before grinding to test balance and weight I decided on a 300mm wheel hollow grind to exchange as much as possible weight of the thick 6mm blade for cutting bevel. Once I had the main bevels done the feel of the knife was much that of the classic Puma White Hunter, a longer version of which I made and of which Commodore here on the forum is the owner now. (I still miss it and MUST make myself one again.)

    The next instinct when using 6mm steel is to taper the tang to optimize balance and decrease weight. But the Kukri's wide blade shape screams for weight in the handle so I skipped the taper to retain balance.

    More on the handle; 6 brass pins and three carbon fiber lined holes might seem over kill to keep the wood on the tang BUT, this thing is a chopper through and through so repeated energy transfer or 'jarring' of the blade to the handle warrants extra precaution. Also, I still kept the 'military' look and feel in mind and the brass pinning on the mahogany scales gave me exactly that. I opted for the less glamorous mahogany for it was often seen on WW1 and WW2 bayonet handles. In a survival situation the carbon fiber lined holes could be used to lash the Kukri to a pole to be used as a spear. This idea also prompted me to add a swage or false edge to the spine at the tip for stabbing efficiency.

    I did some fancy file work on the spine for a thumb grip and of course, I had to add the mysterious 'che' at the ricasso/choil. Also incorporated in the full tang, a finger guard unlike found on the traditional Kukri. Knowing the sharpness of a hollow ground honed blade I prefer that to losing a finger on my own blade and remember, I've added stabbing capability to my Kukri version on top of the chopping capability so forward movement of the hand is a possibility.

    Finally, since I've put the hammered finish on the blade I needed to find a level surface to put my makers mark on, so I opted for the 6mm wide spine:


    Then, the sheath, the knife exits the sheath in a forward motion because of the wide belly unlike normal knives which exits vertically:


    So all in all what was meant to be a knife for the garden shed turned out to be a beaut after the time I spent on it. This one is up for sale if anyone is interested for I want to make more Kukri's. (See the for sale thread.) If it does not sell I'll just keep it for myself to drool over until apocalypse or zombie war but I'm still going to make the rough and ready less refined one for the garden shed, reeds are my enemy and they seem to be invincible, the more I chop the more they sprout!


    Thanks for looking.
    Air Rifle SA Forums Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

  7. #1132
    Sharp Shooter
    ARF Member Of The Year 2011

    User Info Menu

    Default

    My next design challenge and I would sincerely appreciate input from you guys; a youth/junior/first knife for kids. I've had numerous requests and with Christmas coming up I want to get it done.

    Here are my preliminary design considerations:
    -Fixed blade (Less accident prone, folders can close on fingers.)
    -Blade design must be utility and not aggressive so no dagger tips or swages.
    -Leather sheath with belt loop (For safe storage and transportation and when on belt it cannot be mislaid.)
    -Integral finger guard
    -Must be compact and manageable for small hands but yet big enough to be used as a small EDC when the kid grows up, this would also make it viable for adults looking for a compact economic EDC. Must be compact and light enough for a neck knife so sheath must have a lanyard hole. Can then also be a handbag ladies knife.
    -Economic bringing me to the price consideration, it must sell for sub R1000 sheath included but must be 14C28N stainless so no skimping on steel quality.
    -Handle construction and material must be economic yet it must be a piece to instill pride so I'm thinking plain durable hardwood and brass pinning as standard without inlays or liners but at least with a lined lanyard hole.

    Turning to a Google search for ideas on safe knives for kids I quickly realized that living in South Africa puts a different perspective on a utility, the main presumption of Google is that the knife will be used in the kitchen only so accent is on chef's knives rather than outdoor knives. So the kitchen angle must also be incorporated in our knife, kids can help mothers prepare food in the kitchen but the knife must also be able to craft a kettie on a camping trip. The nylon knives will outright not cut the design criteria (excuse the pun.) Cannot give a kid a blunt knife so responsibility of educating the kid as to the safe use of a knife as tool will be the parent's responsibility and consideration. I did see a bushcraft style kids knife on Google with a very bluntish tip but it lacks a finger guard.

    I can and will put together a quick guide to go with the knives on teaching knife safety to kids based on internet research and own experience that could make it easier and less cumbersome for the parent to try think of most dangerous scenarios a kid might get into during knife use.
    Two of the orders I already have is from a single mom with two boys and she requested a rough guide as to what to teach/show the kids outside the kitchen scenario regarding safe knife use.

    As for personal experience; I cannot even remember how old I was when trusted on my own with a knife, I got a full sized Sabatier Jeune hunting knife from my dad when I was 11 years old, carried a pistol at age 15 and a R3 rifle at age 16 but I grew up in a war zone so circumstance was abnormal. My own son had a baby Opinel at age 6 but he only used it on camping trips and under my supervision. I do remember the knife my dad gave my younger sister when she joined the girl scouts, she never lost a finger and on knife use they were taught 'not to cut rocks' with a knife. Me and my dad had quite a chuckle on that one. She got a Puma Jagdnicker, it was commonly sold as a companion knife with the brutally big Puma Waidblatt.


    So, I'll start making sketches, then a wooden template as usual before doing steel profiles. Again, input welcome.
    Thanks for looking.
    Air Rifle SA Forums Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

  8. #1133
    Sharp Shooter
    ARF Member Of The Year 2011

    User Info Menu

    Default

    The knife for the MZE Memorial 100m bench shoot:
    Sandvik 14c28n stainless, double hollow ground with micro bevel, imbuia scales with brass pinning and custom etch on non presentation side:




    And some designs for the youth knife project:
    It is proving to be quite a challenge, I blunted the tip area to a point where I approached a Wharncliffe or "sheep's foot' design, then reverted back to small drop point hunter and a lot in between. What I'm going to do is make some in hardboard templates and get the 'feel' for the most probable one. Like I said, the challenge lies in the fact that it must also be usable to an adult.


    Will keep you posted, thanks for looking.
    Air Rifle SA Forums Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

  9. #1134
    Sharp Shooter

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Stunning knife - someone is going to be very happy!
    Air Rifle SA Forums Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

  10. #1135
    Sharp Shooter
    Forum Sponsor

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tomkat View Post
    Stunning knife - someone is going to be very happy!
    i am...thank you
    Air Rifle SA Forums Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

  11. #1136
    REP: Xtream Airguns

    User Info Menu

    Default

    The kukri is my all time favourite blade! You made it come to life I a manner that makes me envy it! Exceptional work D. Truly!
    Air Rifle SA Forums Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

  12. #1137
    Sharp Shooter

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Lanyard hole would be useful... i think the typical wharncliffe probably most useful... thin blade for low drag and no wedging - i.e. surprise movements... but with a slightly wider blade, to make sure the choil can work as a finger guard... so number 3 and 4 from the top design of 3 width of 4...? Good idea... my kids have been using victorinox pairing knives since the age of 2... under supervision.
    Air Rifle SA Forums Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

  13. #1138
    Sharp Shooter

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Hi
    het iemand dalk Derek van der Merwe se nr of adres? Probeer hom aan die hande kry.
    Frikkie
    Air Rifle SA Forums Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

Similar Threads

  1. For sale: Merwe knives
    By DvdM in forum Blades | Knives
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-11-16, 15:32
  2. Replies: 95
    Last Post: 24-08-15, 08:34
  3. Merwe knives for sale
    By DvdM in forum Blades | Knives
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 17-04-15, 01:52
  4. Merwe knives for sale
    By DvdM in forum Blades | Knives
    Replies: 44
    Last Post: 08-06-14, 11:02
  5. Merwe Knives Inja, dog knives - SOLD OUT
    By DvdM in forum Blades | Knives
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 20-12-13, 21:36

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •