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Thread: Laser Sights

  1. #1
    bikeless's Avatar bikeless
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    Default Laser Sights

    Hi All,
    Has anyone used a laser sight or red dot sight before, are they worth there money, do they even work .?

  2. #2
    Inactive Member

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    Depends what you want to use them for.
    Definately worth it if mounted on a Carbine M16 and you're in Special Ops or SWAT.
    No magnification on Red Dot but easier (and quicker) target aquiring than with normal open sites. I wouldn't use them on a pistol, played with a (I think) Webley with Red Dot, if you move, well then so does the dot. Might be better on Rifle where distance to Red Dot and face position will be more consistent.
    Laser sights, over rated !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Waste of time and money.
    My opinion ofcourse
    <span class='smallblacktext'>[ Edited Fri Aug 06 2004, 03:40PM ]</span>

  3. #3
    Sharp Shooter
    The Professor

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    Hi Guys,

    Well Neil, I am going to contradict you now as I think that red dot sights are eminently suited to pistols (take a look at IPSC Open class), as they only have one point of reference and are predominantly parallax free which means you have a degree of latitude in terms of head position and the dot does not need to placed in the centre of the tube or screen (depending on sight type) as long as it is placed on the target you wish to hit.

    My personal favourite red dot sight is the Hakko "Quatro" which is equipped with a variable reticle featuring dot, crosshair, croshair and dot and circle-dot. The sight acts as a "head-up" display with a 35mm screen rather than a conventional tube.

    Lasers are also quite useful, but as with any equipment if you use the cheapest then don't expect great things. I would personally recommend Beamshot lasers as being good. For rapid shooting from the hip they are very useful. I like to use them on my rat shooting rifle and have killed a lot of rats using them in tight areas where it is not always possible to shoulder the rifle. This shooting is carried out mainly at night and in poorly lit buildings - in full daylight they are not much use.

    Dale

  4. #4
    bikeless's Avatar bikeless
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    Thanks for the info Gents..
    I think i'll get one, I hunt for Rabbits n, rats at night.
    R they suitable for springers.?.

  5. #5
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    it can also be used as a "range finder" when coupled with a scope........

  6. #6
    Inactive Member

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    Tell me more about using it as a "range finder" with a scope... I'm not with you at all now ...

  7. #7
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    i read it in AGW, it didn't say how....................i've thought about it and this is what i come up with..........

    unlike in most/short range applications where the laser is mounted as close and parallel to the barrel, mount it above the scope (directly over the line of sight). suppose the scope is zeroed at 35 yds, adjust the laser mount so that the dot is slam-bang on the center of the cross-hair at that distance. when the target is further/closer than 35 yds, the dot will be below/above the center on the vertical axis.

    by recording relative postions of the dot on the vertical cross-hair (a mildot preferably) of several known distances. a unknown range can be estimated backwards........

    does it make sense?

    way too complicated/time consuming for me thanks

  8. #8
    Sharp Shooter
    The Professor

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    Urabus,

    You have got the concept spot on.

    There are a couple of things to bear in mind with this system:

    First the dot size of the laser needs to be quite small for this to be effective, most of the cheaper lasers have a dot that is equal to 4 inches at 100 yards so 2 inches at 50 yards. Now I personally find that is too big a dot to give an accurate estimate of distance as it covers too much of the target. I prefere a laser that gives a 1.5 inch dot at 100 yards - but the downside is they are more expensive.

    Second, in order to achive a worthwhile degree of offset between dot and crosshair the laser has to be mounted quite high above the scope axis (about 100mm if I remember correctly), or alternatively mounted below the barrel to give the offset.

    Takes a bit of time to set up and log the offset at different distances but once set up very quick in use for hunting.

    Dale
    <span class='smallblacktext'>[ Edited Thu Aug 12 2004, 09:08AM ]</span>

  9. #9
    Inactive Member

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    cool........

    i think i will take one step at the time............
    get my pcp combo.......learn to shoot.........hunt.......lamping...........laser.. .......
    so much to learn, so little time............

  10. #10
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    You've got it all wrong, some much airgunning equipment .... not enough money to buy all of it ....
    <span class='smallblacktext'>[ Edited Thu Aug 12 2004, 04:13PM ]</span>

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