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Thread: Venting Air?

  1. #1
    Sharp Shooter

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    Default Venting Air?

    Does an airstripper need venting holes? What will happen to accuracy if the holes are closed/not there?
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  2. #2
    Marksman
    The Guru

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    same as a silencer I suppose..
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  3. #3
    Sharp Shooter

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    Yes a small one, but the air actually gets stripped before it upsets the pellet's flight.
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  4. #4
    Inactive Member

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    For it to be an airtripper it needs holes. If the holes on an existing airstripper is closed then it will act the same as a light muzzle weight and wont do anything ito accuracy i believe.
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  5. #5
    Protea FT Team '12/'16/'17

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    if the air is stripped and there are no holes, surely the air will hit the end of the stripper and be reflected back into the barrel, this should not be a problem but if the stripper is not on properly it will shoot off ask me i know i ahd my whole barrel shroud shoot off when i closed up the end to form a silencer. it worked 100% untill the pressure shoot the shroud loose and it shot off.
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  6. #6
    Sharp Shooter
    The Professor

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    There is a guy in the UK who has created a combined air-stripper / silencer. The stripper unit acts as a pre-expansion chamber for the silencer. Apparently it works very well.
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  7. #7
    Sharp Shooter

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    Airking, the cone strips the air from the pellet and then everything TD said happens. So I assumed it would be ok since by the time the air bounced back, the pellet would have left the turbulent air behind.

    Dale, yes I have seen pics of that and I would also like to be able to screw on a silencer if I wanted to. That is why I ask this question. I guess no one here would have had any experience on the subject.

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  8. #8
    Protea FT Team '07/'08/'09/'10/'11/'12/'13
    National FT Champ '09/'13

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    I'm not sure, but if my memory serves me well, then the Daystate Mk2 works that way.
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  9. #9
    Inactive Member

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    I have tried both ways and prefer the vent slots or holes. The one I made with holes, has 4 holes 3 point star shape. The 1st 2 holes are 45 degree, 2nd 2 holes are 75 degree and the holes at the end is 90 degree and exit hole is 6mm The one with no vents had slightly more recoil.
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  10. #10
    Inactive Member

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    I'm a bit confused here. What are you gents referring to, is an airstripper not a muzzle brake or are they different. I was always under the impression that a muzzle brake strips air behind the pellet.
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  11. #11
    Inactive Member

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    I think what is referred to here is one of the variations at the muzzle. Some guns have a ported muzzle brake, others have a sound moderator and TWO rifles in particular had an open ended sleeve. The barrel vents into this open ended chamber thereby dissipating the jet of air from the barrel causing a more controlled airflow over a wider area and reducing muzzle flip. The Soviets were very successful with their Soyuz rocket engines as they employed this principle by designing a tube over the bottom of a rocket. The resulting effect is therefore called a 'Kushnerick effect'. As the barrel vents into this chamber, the thrust is spread over a wider area, albeit still within a confined space.

    This principle was copied by two airgun engineers namely Joe Wilkins and Nick Murphy. Joe Wilkins designed and built the Ripley Predator which is something of a misnomer because he was the father of Steve Wilkins who owns Ripley Rifles. Joe was a high class engineer who produced the Predator under his own name and only 20 examples were made between 1987 and 1988.

    The other engineer was a gentleman called Nick Murphy who made a rifle which nobody really heard of and was called the Zenith air rifle. Zeniths were never really advertised and only sold to people in the know. All 16 guns were built between 2001 and 2003 and each took between 2 and 3 months to create by hand, nothing CNC here. Quality wise they were very beautiful and very much in the airgun premier league. Both these rifles had the reputation of being the most 'dead' to shoot in terms of muzzle flip.
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  12. #12
    Sharp Shooter

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    I think what is referred to here is one of the variations at the muzzle. Some guns have a ported muzzle brake, others have a sound moderator and TWO rifles in particular had an open ended sleeve. The barrel vents into this open ended chamber thereby dissipating the jet of air from the barrel causing a more controlled airflow over a wider area and reducing muzzle flip. The Soviets were very successful with their Soyuz rocket engines as they employed this principle by designing a tube over the bottom of a rocket. The resulting effect is therefore called a 'Kushnerick effect'. As the barrel vents into this chamber, the thrust is spread over a wider area, albeit still within a confined space.[/quote1197795600]
    This is exactly not what you want. You want to spread the air as quickly as possible as wide as possible so it does not affect the pellet.
    The other engineer was a gentleman called Nick Murphy who made a rifle which nobody really heard of and was called the Zenith air rifle. Zeniths were never really advertised and only sold to people in the know. All 16 guns were built between 2001 and 2003 and each took between 2 and 3 months to create by hand, nothing CNC here. Quality wise they were very beautiful and very much in the airgun premier league. Both these rifles had the reputation of being the most 'dead' to shoot in terms of muzzle flip.
    There is still guys shooting the Zenith rifle. Muzzle flip is not a big issue for me, because it is very small on a sub 12fpe pcp.

    Does an airstripper need venting holes? What will happen to accuracy if the holes are closed/not there?
    The response you gave has no contribution/solution to the original question asked.
    Not to be negative but you(Falcon) keep going on about the 'Kushnerick effect'. By now everybody on the forum has read about it. It still has nothing to do with the question or does it? Go read up on muzzle brake, muzzle flip compensator and still air cone/airstripper. Maybe you can do some research on how the gasses behave when your bullet/pellet leaves the muzzle. Why is a good crown important etc.... forget about the 'Kushnerick effect'.
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  13. #13
    Inactive Member

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    The one I made is a cone shape bush that fits into a barrleshroud. The entrance of the cone is 5 -10mm from the crown of the barrle, with a 5.5 - 6mm hole through the length of the cone. When the pellet exit the barrle the air rush over the cone towards the end of the shroud and exit out of the vent holes there wil be minimum air behind the pellet going through the hole of the bush.
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  14. #14
    Inactive Member

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    I found it interesting to read about the "Kushnerick effect" for the 1st time in my life. (Maybe I was not reading the Forum as often as I thought I did.)
    Quite frankly I think most of us are farting into a strong wind with all the paraphernalia we put onto our rifles believing it will improve our shooting. I am as guilty as anybody else, don't get me wrong. I have seen that children put t 60 shots into the 10 ring ammittedly 10m with around 58 "X"rings, using a stock standard S400 with the plastic what "must I call it". The same goes for the rest of the rifles they shoot with. That it makes a difference might be true but "how much is the question?" and "what does it do for you and I?" the next question. Talking of myself and I think about lots of guys out there. I always look for something else to blame for my incompetence with the rifle to justify my missing the shots, be it a bump of the rifle,strong wind, grass in front of a target or something that I can still screw on or off the rifle. Just my piece.
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  15. #15
    Inactive Member

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    At the end of the day it's a matter of personal preference as to whether one wants to use a silencer, muzzle brake or air stripper. They all strip air behind the pellet to varying degrees but their principles in achieving this objective differs between them. But as I said it's based on personal preference. If one needed holes then a ported muzzle brake would be the answer.
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