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Thread: Compressors

  1. #1
    Sharp Shooter

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    Default Compressors

    I am thinking of buying a compressor to fill my PCP's and dive tanks at home.

    What I want to know is if it is safe to do if you keep you're dive tanks within the hydro test times.

    Also what compressors would be the best to do the job. I am not really willing to spend more than 15k for a compressor and if those expensive one are the only safe one's I would rather buy more dive tanks.

    I have seen a couple small shoe box compressors advertised at very affordable prices but are they safe to use?

    Please share your experiences with these compressors. Any advice would be appreciated.

    Thanks.
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  2. #2
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    MOT: Steyr Sport Service South Africa

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    There are a couple of points to consider.

    1. moisture in the air once compressed and filled into the tank.
    2. the show box needs to have a standard shop compressor feeding it with air

    There was a compressor at Divetek for R7000 that I had a look at. It requires an external water bucket to circulate water for cooling. The biggest concern that I had or still have the moisture that will or would be in the compressed air that would now be in the dive tank. It would settle on the bottom but it would eventually get into the rifle cylinder and that is a problem because these cylinders never get checked.
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  3. #3
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    I bought a compressor from Louis. It is for air rifles (some oil get mixed in with the air over times), so dont go try diving with it. It has a built in cooling system and it gets rid of the water in the air that is generated when the air is compressed. Expensive solution though, around R30k methinks. Haven't had any problems with it though.
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  4. #4
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    I have one of those mini compressors that I bought 7mths ago, I haven't had any problems with it yet, they have 2 moisture traps in each side, one when the air comes out of the "piston" and the other where the pressure high pressure hose is attached, each one has a bleed valve that when you finish filling the rifle or bottle expels the moisture that is trapped.
    Alternatively, you also can put a inline filter to further trap the moisture the escapes the other traps, my is similar one that divetek is selling but I paid around 5/6K (I don't remember) for mine and is in use everyday, it's rated to 300bar but I only fill my bottle up to 230/240bar and my rifles to 200/220bar not to push the little guy too far.
    pellet-guns.co.za sells them for R6700
    Last edited by gfighter; 02-06-17 at 09:01.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Total SS View Post
    There are a couple of points to consider.

    1. moisture in the air once compressed and filled into the tank.
    2. the show box needs to have a standard shop compressor feeding it with air

    There was a compressor at Divetek for R7000 that I had a look at. It requires an external water bucket to circulate water for cooling. The biggest concern that I had or still have the moisture that will or would be in the compressed air that would now be in the dive tank. It would settle on the bottom but it would eventually get into the rifle cylinder and that is a problem because these cylinders never get checked.
    Thanks for the input. Why would the cylinder not be checked?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mcwidowmaker View Post
    I bought a compressor from Louis. It is for air rifles (some oil get mixed in with the air over times), so dont go try diving with it. It has a built in cooling system and it gets rid of the water in the air that is generated when the air is compressed. Expensive solution though, around R30k methinks. Haven't had any problems with it though.
    Won't this oil be explosive?
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  6. #6
    SAFTAA Chairman
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    MOT: Steyr Sport Service South Africa

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    McJack

    the cylinders on the rifles or pistols never get checked. I know the Steyr cylinders need a special tool to open the cylinder (one can be made easily). Steyr and Anschutz both have a 10 year life span on their cylinders for this reason.
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  7. #7
    Sharp Shooter

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    Quote Originally Posted by gfighter View Post
    I have one of those mini compressors that I bought 7mths ago, I haven't had any problems with it yet, they have 2 moisture traps in each side, one when the air comes out of the "piston" and the other where the pressure high pressure hose is attached, each one has a bleed valve that when you finish filling the rifle or bottle expels the moisture that is trapped.
    Alternatively, you also can put a inline filter to further trap the moisture the escapes the other traps, my is similar one that divetek is selling but I paid around 5/6K (I don't remember) for mine and is in use everyday, it's rated to 300bar but I only fill my bottle up to 230/240bar and my rifles to 200/220bar not to push the little guy too far.
    pellet-guns.co.za sells them for R6700
    Thanks gfighter. I was also looking at those compressors. I just want to be safe and your feedback help a lot.
    They are very affordable and I am in Rustenburg area with no dive shops willing to be of service. It is an schlep for me being on a farm it always means two trips one to take the cylinder in and one to collect the day or week later. I have a hutsan pump for in between but that is a shlep as well ☺

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Total SS View Post
    McJack

    the cylinders on the rifles or pistols never get checked. I know the Steyr cylinders need a special tool to open the cylinder (one can be made easily). Steyr and Anschutz both have a 10 year life span on their cylinders for this reason.
    Now I see what you mean SS
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  8. #8
    Sharp Shooter

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    Quote Originally Posted by McJack View Post
    Thanks gfighter. I was also looking at those compressors. I just want to be safe and your feedback help a lot.
    They are very affordable and I am in Rustenburg area with no dive shops willing to be of service. It is an schlep for me being on a farm it always means two trips one to take the cylinder in and one to collect the day or week later. I have a Hatsan pump for in between but that is a shlep as well ☺



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    Now I see what you mean SS
    Well in this case, the compressor will be a good investment, it will save you a lots of time and money, I regularly check and maintain mine, oil change when turns dark, inlet air filter, o-rings, moisture traps etc, just to keep the little guy on top of it's game and to prolong the lifespan of it.
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  9. #9
    Sharp Shooter

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    The oil is a compressor oil and I suspect that the quantity in the air is too small for any type of reaction.
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  10. #10
    Sharp Shooter

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    I appreciate all the input. Thanks. I would love to have a limitless air supply right at my house. Think the most important thing is like you stated it has to be done responsibly cylinders checked en maintenance done.
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  11. #11
    Sharp Shooter

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    McJack, you will not regret it, it will make you life a lot easier and you will shoot a lots more too
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  12. #12
    Sharp Shooter

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    Quote Originally Posted by gfighter View Post
    McJack, you will not regret it, it will make you life a lot easier and you will shoot a lots more too
    At he moment when my cylinder is empty I use a hatsan pump so yes I will shoot a lot more if I don't have to pump Al the time. Hehe
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  13. #13
    Sharp Shooter

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    Quote Originally Posted by McJack View Post
    At he moment when my cylinder is empty I use a hatsan pump so yes I will shoot a lot more if I don't have to pump Al the time. Hehe
    It's a pain in the backside this hand pump story
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  14. #14
    Sharp Shooter

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    300 bar is a very high and dangerous pressure. To put it in perspective 300 bar = 300kg weight per square centimetre (an area smaller than your thumbnail).

    When you compress ambient air to this pressure it heats up tremendously and most of the humidity in that air will condense to water.
    More water will condense as the air cools down so unless using a chemical or refrigerative drying system, you need to make sure the air is cooled to equal or below ambient temp before putting it in the rifle's cylinder or a scuba tank.....otherwise water will accumulate there over time.

    Regarding oil.....most compressors have oil lubricated moving parts so a little oil gets into the compressed air. At 300 bar the oxygen partial pressure is about 20% ... equivalent to 60 bar as pure oxygen. This WILL oxidise (burn) all oil that is present to water and carbon dioxide but it will only cause some additional heat, not fire or explosion if the amount of oil is low as it should be if the machine is mechanically healthy.

    In terms of SA pressurised equipment regulations, dive bottles fall in a class of vessel termed 'transportable gas containers' but rifle cylinders smaller than 500cc do not...this is probably the reason why rifle air tanks do not require inspection every 36 months or less.
    Section 44 of OHS Act of SA (Act 85 of 1993) relates to pressure equipment and refers to the Pressure Equipment Regs which define relevant standards. SANS 10019 is the referenced national standard for transportable gas containers. Summarising it : to legally fill your own SCUBA cylinder you must be competent (conversant with the regulations) and comply with the regulations. There are pre and post filling checks you must carry out and there is a section relating to charging pressure/temerature relationships that is important). You also may not fill any cylinders that are overdue for testing and inspections (the temptation will be there) .

    Go for it but educate yourself and please be very careful.

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  15. #15
    Sharp Shooter

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    Quote Originally Posted by JXV View Post
    300 bar is a very high and dangerous pressure. To put it in perspective 300 bar = 300kg weight per square centimetre (an area smaller than your thumbnail).

    When you compress ambient air to this pressure it heats up tremendously and most of the humidity in that air will condense to water.
    More water will condense as the air cools down so unless using a chemical or refrigerative drying system, you need to make sure the air is cooled to equal or below ambient temp before putting it in the rifle's cylinder or a scuba tank.....otherwise water will accumulate there over time.

    Regarding oil.....most compressors have oil lubricated moving parts so a little oil gets into the compressed air. At 300 bar the oxygen partial pressure is about 20% ... equivalent to 60 bar as pure oxygen. This WILL oxidise (burn) all oil that is present to water and carbon dioxide but it will only cause some additional heat, not fire or explosion if the amount of oil is low as it should be if the machine is mechanically healthy.

    In terms of SA pressurised equipment regulations, dive bottles fall in a class of vessel termed 'transportable gas containers' but rifle cylinders smaller than 500cc do not...this is probably the reason why rifle air tanks do not require inspection every 36 months or less.
    Section 44 of OHS Act of SA (Act 85 of 1993) relates to pressure equipment and refers to the Pressure Equipment Regs which define relevant standards. SANS 10019 is the referenced national standard for transportable gas containers. Summarising it : to legally fill your own SCUBA cylinder you must be competent (conversant with the regulations) and comply with the regulations. There are pre and post filling checks you must carry out and there is a section relating to charging pressure/temerature relationships that is important). You also may not fill any cylinders that are overdue for testing and inspections (the temptation will be there) .

    Go for it but educate yourself and please be very careful.

    Thanks for the heads up. I have to state that it scares me to. That is why I started this thread. Might be better to fill the cylinder to 230 bar only.

    What about Al the moisture entering the rifle when filling with a hand pump?

    If you want your rifle cylinder checked where would take it to have it done or is it just a matter of cleaning the rifle cylinder?
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