Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Weihrauch rifles - can anyone help sort them out?

  1. #1
    Inactive Member

    User Info Menu

    Default Weihrauch rifles - can anyone help sort them out?

    I'm a little more than idly curious - perhaps because I know for a fact that while Weihrauch produce excellent rifles, they know very little about producing coherent marketing material. Such as a product brochure that answers this fundamental question about each rifle: What's it for?

    Even more confusing is that the model numbers seem to have been arbitrarily assigned, so you can't navigate their product line-up by making the assumption that "Greater product number = more advanced rifle".
    I know I'm not the only one who's confused, because companies selling these guns usually don't give their own description of them. They just copy and paste the standard marketing blah-blah-blah from the Weihrauch catalogue.

    As far as I'm currently able to tell, and leaving out their pistols and rimfire/centrefire rifles, their pellet rifle line-up have the following major roles.
    Can anyone add to, or help correct, these definitions?

    (And, No, right now, I do not have anything better to do.)

    HW30 M / II
    Entry-level break-barrel target rifle for juniors.

    HW30 S
    30 M / II with interchangeable front sight inserts and 'Rekord' trigger.

    HW35
    HW30S with 22% more power.

    HW50 M / II
    Entry-level break-barrel target rifle for adults. Basically an HW30 with 32% more power.

    HW50S
    50 M / II with interchangeable front sight inserts and 'Rekord' trigger.

    HW57
    Entry-level adult rifle. Underlever cocking, but otherwise, same basic specs as HW50S.

    HW77
    Upgraded HW57 with 16% more power, removable front sight and slightly more luxurious stock.

    HW97K
    Modified HW77 with muzzle brake, no iron sights, and wider choice of stocks (including thumbhole stock). Developed specifically for Field Target.
    (The 'K', for 'Kurz', or 'Short', comes from the 97 having a 170mm shorter barrel than the 77 because of its integrated muzzle break - even though the 77 and 97 share the same power plant and are about the same overall length.)

    HW90
    Adult break-barrel rifle with Theoben gas ram. Made specifically for open-sight hunting, but accepts scopes as well. Power adjustable from 'That tickles!' to 'Put-that-thing-down-and-back-away-slowly'.

    HW80
    HW50 with longer barrel and 18% more power.

    HW85
    HW80, but with a basic Walnut stock instead of Beech.

    HW95
    HW80 with a choice of two even-more refined Walnut stocks.

    HW98
    Break-barrel, designed for precision shooting at longer distances. Heavy barrel, fully adjustable stock, no iron sights. Slightly less power than HW80 and derivatives.

    HW100
    Weihrauch's take on the Air Arms S510. 'Spare-no-expense' 14-shot lever-action PCP.

    HW 101
    Weihrauch's take on the Air Arms S500. Single-shot, but otherwise identical to HW100. (This gun doesn't appear in the 2018 Weihrauch catalogue, and I've heard people say that it was discontinued.)

    HW110 ST / STK
    'Budget' 10-shot lever-action PCP. Simpler action than the 100, polymer-based construction, Picatinny scope mounting, soft-touch stock only. The ST ('Soft Touch') is the standard-length rifle. The STK ('Soft Touch Karbine') is a great deal smaller.
    (Confusingly, these guns don't appear in the 2018 Weihrauch catalogue either.)
    Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

  2. #2
    Sharp Shooter

    User Info Menu

    Default

    HW77 preceded both HW97 and HW57 which is a recent model.

    HW100 fills a similar niche to AA S510 but I think it appeared on the market before the S510. It is also regulated whereas the S510 was not until a regulator became an option recently. All HW100 are regulated, it's an integral part of the mechanism.

    HW110 is quite new. Have not eyeballed one yet
    Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

  3. #3
    Inactive Member

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JXV View Post
    HW110 is quite new. Have not eyeballed one yet
    Neither have I, but I'd like to!

    It would be interesting to know how the local vendors price the 110 relative to the 100.
    From what I can tell, the whole point of the 110 was supposed to be greater market share through a simpler rifle that was easier and quicker to manufacture in volume (and therefore, could be given a more competitive price tag).
    If it's not substantially cheaper in SA than the 100, it will be priced out of the market.
    Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

  4. #4
    Sharp Shooter
    Forum Sponsor

    User Info Menu

    Default

    The HW110 is substantially cheaper than the HW100, currently just under R4000.00 less.
    Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

  5. #5
    Sharp Shooter

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Just some of my 2-Cents,
    except the HW85 I fettled & tuned them all.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick V View Post
    I'm a little more than idly curious - perhaps because I know for a fact that while Weihrauch produce excellent rifles, they know very little about producing coherent marketing material. Such as a product brochure that answers this fundamental question about each rifle: What's it for?

    Even more confusing is that the model numbers seem to have been arbitrarily assigned, so you can't navigate their product line-up by making the assumption that "Greater product number = more advanced rifle".
    I know I'm not the only one who's confused, because companies selling these guns usually don't give their own description of them. They just copy and paste the standard marketing blah-blah-blah from the Weihrauch catalogue.

    As far as I'm currently able to tell, and leaving out their pistols and rimfire/centrefire rifles, their pellet rifle line-up have the following major roles.
    Can anyone add to, or help correct, these definitions?

    (And, No, right now, I do not have anything better to do.)

    HW30 M / II
    Entry-level break-barrel target rifle for juniors.
    simple Perfekt trigger with resetable safety at rear

    HW30 S
    30 M / II with interchangeable front sight inserts and 'Rekord' trigger.
    25mm-system, stroke 60mm, ball bearing barrel latch


    HW35
    HW30S with 22% more power.
    no
    30mm-system (like HW80), stroke 65 to 69mm, unique side wedge barrel latch


    HW50 M / II
    Entry-level break-barrel target rifle for adults. Basically an HW30 with 32% more power.
    simple Perfekt trigger with resetable safety at rear

    HW50S
    50 M / II with interchangeable front sight inserts and 'Rekord' trigger.
    26mm-system, stroke 70 to 72mm, central wedge lock barrel latch


    HW57
    Entry-level adult rifle. Underlever cocking, but otherwise, same basic specs as HW50S.
    26mm-system, stroke 81mm, tap loader, no separate compression tube


    HW77
    Upgraded HW57 ??? with 16% more power, removable front sight and slightly more luxurious stock.
    former models 25mm-system, stroke 81mm, separate compression tube
    later models 26mm-system

    HW97K
    Modified HW77 with muzzle brake, no iron sights, and wider choice of stocks (including thumbhole stock). Developed specifically for Field Target.
    (The 'K', for 'Kurz', or 'Short', comes from the 97 having a 170mm shorter barrel than the 77 because of its integrated muzzle break - even though the 77 and 97 share the same power plant and are about the same overall length.)
    26mm-system only, stroke 81mm, separate compression tube


    HW90
    Adult break-barrel rifle with Theoben gas ram. Made specifically for open-sight hunting, but accepts scopes as well. Power adjustable from 'That tickles!' to 'Put-that-thing-down-and-back-away-slowly'.
    30mm-system, Elite trigger


    HW80
    HW50 with longer barrel and 18% more power.
    definitely not as
    30mm-system (like HW35), but stroke 80 to 90mm


    HW85
    HW80, but with a basic Walnut stock instead of Beech.
    definitely not as
    26mm-system, stroke 85mm (like 95 & 98)

    HW95
    HW80 with a choice of two even-more refined Walnut stocks.
    see HW85

    HW98
    Break-barrel, designed for precision shooting at longer distances. Heavy barrel, fully adjustable stock, no iron sights. Slightly less power than HW80 and derivatives.
    see HW85


    HW100
    Weihrauch's take on the Air Arms S510. 'Spare-no-expense' 14-shot lever-action PCP.

    HW 101
    Weihrauch's take on the Air Arms S500. Single-shot, but otherwise identical to HW100. (This gun doesn't appear in the 2018 Weihrauch catalogue, and I've heard people say that it was discontinued.)

    HW110 ST / STK
    'Budget' 10-shot lever-action PCP. Simpler action than the 100, polymer-based construction, Picatinny scope mounting, soft-touch stock only. The ST ('Soft Touch') is the standard-length rifle. The STK ('Soft Touch Karbine') is a great deal smaller.
    (Confusingly, these guns don't appear in the 2018 Weihrauch catalogue either.)

    Any power reference between the models is unapropriate as depending from individual caliber and set up.

    Happy shooting anyway.
    Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

  6. #6
    Sharp Shooter
    The Professor

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick V View Post
    Can anyone add to, or help correct, these definitions?
    HW25 - junior break barrel rifle.



    HW30 Mk II - Entry-level break-barrel target rifle for juniors.



    HW30 S - Same as 30 MkII, but with interchangeable front sight inserts and 'Rekord' trigger.

    Ball detent barrel lock and breech plug secured by screws.




    HW35 -
    HW30S with 22% more power.

    No, not related to HW30 - HW35 far predates the HW30 and is a full size adult rifle with approx 30mm cylinder bore, over 1 million apparently made, made in a variety of styles with differing stocks and barrel lengths.

    Features pull forwards barrel lock catch and articulated cocking link.



    HW50 Mk II -
    Entry-level break-barrel target general purpose rifle for adults. Basically an HW30 with 32% more power.

    No, larger rifle than HW30, chisel detent barrel lock and originally with screw in breech block, now changed to the style retained by push in blocks.




    HW50S

    50 Mk II with interchangeable front sight inserts and 'Rekord' trigger.

    HW50S is currently marketed as the HW99S in the UK.



    HW55 - HW50 sized target rifle, lower power, rotating, adjustable barrel lock, target peep sights and refined version of Rekord trigger - several variants defined by stock style. Discontinued.



    HW57 - Entry-level adult rifle. Underlever cocking, pop up breech.

    No relation to HW77.




    HW77 -
    Upgraded HW57 with 16% more power, removable front sight and slightly more luxurious stock.

    The HW77 was released around 1984, years before the HW57 was conceived.

    Heavy underlever rifle with sliding breech system, this rifle was the first must have FT rifle.

    Now in Mk3 guise with updated stock styles.

    Available in full length rifle format and carbine 'K' version.



    HW97K -
    Modified HW77 with basic sound moderator, no iron sights, and wider choice of stocks (including thumbhole stock). Developed specifically for Field Target.
    (The 'K', for 'Kurz', or 'Short', comes from the 97 having a 170mm shorter barrel than the 77 because of its integrated muzzle break - even though the 77 and 97 share the same power plant and are about the same overall length.)

    First model HW97K's were longer than the current version with the moderator extending beyond the lever catch by approximately 3 inches.

    There was a limited run commemerative Mk1 HW97 with green laminate stock and satin nickel plated underlever.






    HW90 -
    Adult break-barrel rifle with Theoben gas ram. Made specifically for open-sight hunting, but accepts scopes as well. Power adjustable from 'That tickles!' to 'Put-that-thing-down-and-back-away-slowly'.



    HW90K - carbine barrel, scope only variant of the HW90.



    HW80 -
    HW50 with longer barrel and 18% more power.

    No relation to HW50.

    A re-design of the HW35 by Beeman in the US to get a higher power spring rifle, barrel lock done away with and single piece cocking arm.

    Marketed in US as the Beeman R1 and as the HW80 elsewhere.

    Available in full length and 'K' versions.

    HW80 Mk1.

    Beeman R1.


    HW85 -
    HW80, but with a basic Walnut stock instead of Beech.

    Not directly related to HW80 - original mid 1980's HW85 were a slimmer cylinder rifle designed as a lighter weight rifle still producing 12-16 ft.lbs depending on market.

    Originally with screw in breech plug and raised alloy scope rail.

    The original version now discontinued.

    First model HW85.Current HW85.


    HW95 -
    HW80 with a choice of two even-more refined Walnut stocks.

    Not HW80 related - newer design mid weight break barrel rifle, breech plug retained by four press in tiles instead of screw in block. Originally supplied without iron sights. Later models offer sight options.

    A version has been reclassified as HW85 when fitted with iron sights.

    Stock options are beech with a laminate option in the past.



    HW98 -
    Break-barrel, designed for precision shooting at longer distances. Heavy barrel, fully adjustable stock, no iron sights. Slightly less power than HW80 and derivatives.

    An HW95 action with a shrouded barrel and beech stock with adjustable cheekpiece and fore-end.





    Some corrections in bold text above.

    I have owned examples of all of the rifles listed above with the exception of the HW25, HW30 and HW57, these three rifles although I haven't owned them I have had opportunity to handle and shoot examples of them.
    Last edited by Dale; 12-02-19 at 16:35.
    Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

  7. #7
    Inactive Member

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Pelletcaster and Dale: thanks for the input!

    In a way, every answer begs a new question.
    Naturally, it's useless asking anybody behind the counter at a typical gun shop "Which of these Weihrauchs is suitable for me?" Do that, and you might as well hand them a blank cheque with your signature on it.

    At the moment, I only have direct experience of four Weihrauchs, one of which I own:
    HW100T (converted to S) (.177)
    HW77 (.177) Belongs to an older cousin of mine.
    HW90 (.177) Belongs to a farmer down the road from me.
    HW98 (.177) Belongs to the gent who sold me the HW100.
    Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

  8. #8
    Sharp Shooter

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Lots of info available on the web to educate yourself to the level you desire.
    Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

  9. #9
    Marksman

    User Info Menu

    Default

    The HW85 HW95 and HW98 were derived from rifles made to use up the BSF parts inventory when HW bought BSF. a mix of parts from both, resulting in the Marksman 70, 72, and the Beeman r10. I own a Marksman 72 and A HW85 iirc fwiw Joe
    Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums

  10. #10
    Inactive Member

    User Info Menu

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kettieklip View Post
    Lots of info available on the web to educate yourself to the level you desire.
    I agree. Just look at the information that experienced airgunners have contributed to this thread!
    Sign Up To Air Rifle SA Forums


Similar Threads

  1. Where to buy new Weihrauch rifles from?
    By GSX1400 in forum Airgun Discussions
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 11-09-15, 16:30
  2. Weihrauch air rifles
    By Antman in forum Airgun Discussions
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 14-08-09, 22:24

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Friends of Air Rifle SA