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Thread: dieseling springer?

  1. #1
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    Default dieseling springer?

    anyone had experience for that?

    45% power increase and muzzle flash sounds interesting.




    http://www.scienceinafrica.co.za/2004/april/airgun.htm

  2. #2
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    Hmm, what this guy is telling you to do is possibly destroying your rifle.
    His term of sporting rifles is a little off, dieseling is definately not used in any decent designed, well maintained rifle.

    Pop-gun rifles, like 10m rifles, rely on the spring pushing a piston to compress air and to expell this pellet.

    Combustion, however is needed to reach the speeds required for hunting say. Combustion is restricted to the compression chamber, where the piston compressing the air, and with the aid of a lubricant on the walls of the compression chamber ignites. Polishing the compression chamber walls to a mirror like finish is actually doing more harm than good, seeing as there will be no 'pockets' for the oil to reside in. Thus increasing the piston seal wear and removing any possible combustion.
    Normal, correct combustion expells the pellet and slows the piston head down before slapping the end of the cylinder.

    Dieseling is achieved by adding oil or grease infront of the piston head and within the barrel. The transfer port is the hottest 'part' of the equation, thus igniting with the oil / grease and air, creating a maintained explosion and thus expelling the pellet with alot of noise and smoke. This creates a backward force pounding the piston head in the reverse direction, compressing the spring again, then slapping into the end of the cylinder seeing as the pellet has already left the barrel as there is no force to slow the piston head down.
    Dieseling will occur on all new and serviced springers, due to the settling down of oils and grease. It should not last very long.

    With the authors directions, you would probably destroy the piston seal, or possibly break or at very least bend the compression spring.

    Also laughed at the comparison of 'sporting' springers to actual firearms.

    ...

  3. #3
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    hehe... maybe destroying our rifles is what he real want behind of story.


  4. #4
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    Must be a very good friend of a certain Director in the SAPD.... Seems to me they have got the same very one-sided view of the situation.

  5. #5
    Anton's Avatar Anton
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    In my opinion the article doesn't do the sport any justice. If I had read it, without having an understanding of air-rifles and how they work, I'd be very alarmed at the fact that air rifles aren't licenced. Most springers produce a little smoke during the settling-in period, but in all my years of shooting with springers I've only had it once that the oil ignited. I agree with Avion, try purposefully doing this a few times and you'll have a non-functional rifle - and probably the police on your doorstep as well because of the noise it makes!

  6. #6
    Sharp Shooter

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    Avion- you studied that book very well!

  7. #7
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    Wasn?t there a rifle on the market not so long ago with a tiny hole in the piston chamber so you can add a drop or two or oil for the dieseling effect?
    I can?t remember who made them but I think it was some Chinese company.

    As far as I know they weren?t very successful.

  8. #8
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    I had a look at the article.
    Weird one, he complains about how "dangerous" dieselling can make an airgun and then also tells people how to cause dieselling on purpose.
    How old is this article ?
    ID10T

  9. #9
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    Yep Lewis. I mean I've been playing with springers for nearly 20 years but after reading that book, it all made sense. In my younger years I made some dubious modifications to the rifles that only recently I see how far from right I was.

    The book is doing the rounds at the moment. WolfFlow has it currently, thereafter Refresh has dibs.

    Edit=
    spyker: IIRC springers with leather seals, require you to keep the seal moist. Might be for that??

    ...
    <span class='smallblacktext'>[ Edited Tue Jun 07 2005, 09:48AM ]</span>

  10. #10
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    avion, No, that hole was made specifically so you can add oil to up the power.
    I remember an article where they did a test on one of the rifles and the springs actually cracked from the detonation!!!


  11. #11
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    Ouch! Did it damage the stock aswell? Seen a few of the eastern variants do this with power mods.

    ...

  12. #12
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    Dunno. If i remember correctly, they had synthetic stocks.

  13. #13
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    Was this not a thing called a Vulcan? I have read something somewhere about a rifle like this, but can't for the life of me remember where. Think it was on an overseas site.

  14. #14
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    I don't know.
    I actually found this site [link=hyperlink url]http://www.airgun.org/articles/etherattachments.html[/link] that uses ether for controlled detonation in a HW35. With the ether attachment it was called the HW35 Barracuda.

    Apparently it wasn't very accurate.

    This is not the same rifle I was thinking of originally. The other one definitely used oil for detonation
    <span class='smallblacktext'>[ Edited Tue Jun 07 2005, 11:15AM ]</span>

  15. #15
    MOT: Thomson Pneumatic Rifles

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    Hi Guys,

    I read the "science" article a few months back, sent the guy an email and never recieved an answer. And there I thought science was all about facts!!?? I agree with you avion in as much as dieseling is to be avoided if at all possible, not only dose it reck the gun, but it also nock accuracy (which is the whole point no!) to hell.
    Anton the rifle you mite be refering to was the Barracuda (Iwill look up in Smith's who made it) which had a separate tube of ether (spelling) and was in .22 cal only, heavy pellet better accuracy, for deiseling to work it must be the same each time, that is why this gun worked because each time you loded the gun a single dose was added and you could not double dose. It was not arround for long.

    The science paper guy is a quack!!!

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